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There's a lovely song In Act II, scene 5 of As You Like It. Once upon a time, I used to sing a vocal setting of this by Douglas Moore, which has a lovely soaring line on "Here shall he see no enemy, but winter and rough weather." Alas, I'm unable to find it on the interweb to share with you. There are settings by Ralph Vaughn Williams as well as by Patrick Doyle for the 2006 movie version.


Under the Greenwood Tree
by William Shakespeare

Under the greenwood tree
Who loves to lie with me,
And tune his merry note
Unto the sweet bird's throat—
Come hither, come hither, come hither!
Here shall he see
No enemy
But winter and rough weather.

Who doth ambition shun
And loves to live i' the sun,
Seeking the food he eats
And pleased with what he gets—
Come hither, come hither, come hither!
Here shall he see
No enemy
But winter and rough weather.


After the conclusion of Amiens's song, Jaques provides a more cynical verse set to the same tune, and some conversation ensues. Here is the exchange:

Jaques
I'll give you a verse to this note that I made
yesterday in despite of my invention.

Amiens
And I'll sing it.

Jaques
Thus it goes:
If it do come to pass
That any man turn ass,
Leaving his wealth and ease,
A stubborn will to please,
Ducdame, ducdame, ducdame:
Here shall he see
Gross fools as he,
An if he will come to me.

Amiens
What's that 'ducdame'?

Jaques
'Tis a Greek* invocation, to call fools into a circle.

*Greek here is used in the manner of "it's all Greek to me" - it's not actually a Greek word at all. The word "ducdame" was probably pronounced a three-syllable word. Perhaps it is meant to be nonsense, or perhaps it's derived from Latin "duc ad me", which means "bring him to me".

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