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This month, my poetry sisters and I were tackling triolets. A triolet is a short poem of just eight lines, rhymed ABaAabAB, where the capital letters are repeated lines. Basically, once you've written the first two lines, you only have three more to go (the lower case lines). Triolets were originally devotional poems, and then became popular as comedic forms, but they can be used for lots of things, serious topics included. There's no real fixed metre for triolets, although a lot of people use iambic tetrameter (four iambs per line, taDUM taDUM taDUM taDUM).

Liz Garton Scanlon picked the form, and said we needed to use at least two from the following list of words in our poems: orange, fall, chill, light, change

As you can se below, I used three: light, fall, and chill.


The glow of leaves in yellow light—
the amber glow of sun in fall—
is swallowed as day turns to night.
The glow of leaves in yellow light
when crisp chill wind sets them in flight
enchants. In winter, I’ll recall
the glow of leaves in yellow light,
the amber glow of sun in fall.

You can find the poems of my poetry sisters at their blogs. You can find the rest of this week's Poetry Friday posts by clicking the box below.

Laura Purdie Salas
Tanita Davis
Liz Garton Scanlon
Tricia Stohr-Hunt
Sara Lewis Holmes





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Comments

( 26 comments — Leave a comment )
Linda Baie
Nov. 3rd, 2017 03:51 am (UTC)
that light
I have taken many photos this year when I find a tree that's 'glowing', Kelly, just as you've described in your poem. I love the rhythm of it, like a romp through a pile of leaves, too! Nice response to the challenge.
kellyrfineman
Nov. 3rd, 2017 09:34 pm (UTC)
Re: that light
Thanks!
Tricia Stohr-Hunt
Nov. 3rd, 2017 02:09 pm (UTC)
I love the enjambment in this poem. And your repeated lines are lovely. What a beautiful homage to fall.

Edited at 2017-11-03 02:10 pm (UTC)
kellyrfineman
Nov. 3rd, 2017 09:36 pm (UTC)
I really wish I could have pulled it off better still, but . . .

I kept thinking of the start of "Aedh Wishes for the Cloths of Heaven": Had I the heaven's embroidered cloths/ enrought with gold and silver light,/ the blue, and the dim, and the dark cloths/ of night and light and the half-light"
Liz Garton Scanlon
Nov. 5th, 2017 12:38 pm (UTC)
enjambment
I really do think you're the queen of enjambment, Kelly. Blows me away every time....
kellyrfineman
Nov. 8th, 2017 05:04 pm (UTC)
Re: enjambment
The art of enjambment isn't hard to master. It's just going "how do I not end this rhyme at the end of a line?" now and again.
TS Davis
Nov. 3rd, 2017 04:04 pm (UTC)
Triolets done right
Now, see: YOURS has a compelling, prevailing image, and sticks with it. I think this form eludes me mostly because I want to put too much into them - the beautiful amber-gold simplicity of this one shines.
kellyrfineman
Nov. 3rd, 2017 09:37 pm (UTC)
Re: Triolets done right
With the amount of repetitions in the poem, it's hard to travel too far . . .
Jane Whittingham
Nov. 4th, 2017 05:20 am (UTC)
Sigh, I'll be clinging to those memories of golden leaves and golden light all winter long!
kellyrfineman
Nov. 8th, 2017 05:04 pm (UTC)
Me too. I'm especially fond of the witch hazel out front, which is a gorgeous gold-yellow!
Mary Lee Hahn
Nov. 4th, 2017 10:45 am (UTC)
Poetry Princess Fridays are my favorite Poetry Fridays of all!

You have chosen my favorite sight of fall -- trees that glow with an inner light. Your poem does read like a song.
kellyrfineman
Nov. 8th, 2017 05:05 pm (UTC)
Thank you! That is just what I was aiming for (song). And I do love the quality of the light in fall, and those glowing bright leaves.
Molly Hogan
Nov. 4th, 2017 12:10 pm (UTC)
Oh, this is so beautiful--an elegant homage to fall! So skillfully crafted, so deceptively simple. Love it!
kellyrfineman
Nov. 8th, 2017 05:05 pm (UTC)
The triolet is great for "deceptively simple". All those repeating lines!
kaymcgriff
Nov. 4th, 2017 03:20 pm (UTC)
lovely
This is such a lovely tribute to fall. The repeated lines and lush images give such a feeling of peace.
kellyrfineman
Nov. 8th, 2017 05:06 pm (UTC)
Re: lovely
Thank you - and we can all use a little peace!
lpsalas
Nov. 4th, 2017 08:13 pm (UTC)
Kelly, I love this! The amber glow being swallowed, and that chill wind setting the leaves in flight. Just beautiful. I wanted to do fall, but I knew I would end up being cliched. You made this fresh!
kellyrfineman
Nov. 8th, 2017 05:06 pm (UTC)
Thanks, Laura!!
Liz Garton Scanlon
Nov. 5th, 2017 12:39 pm (UTC)
This creates such a living picture, Kelly -- it's lovely....
kellyrfineman
Nov. 8th, 2017 05:06 pm (UTC)
"a living picture" - thanks, Liz!
Brenda Harsham
Nov. 5th, 2017 09:02 pm (UTC)
Form
I love when form seems secondary, especially in the intricate forms. You've made that happen here, and the things that shines is the image you paint. Well done.
kellyrfineman
Nov. 8th, 2017 05:07 pm (UTC)
Re: Form
Form should ALWAYS seem secondary, really, though we can always find examples where it's not the case. Thank you so much for stopping by and for leaving a comment!!
redwriterhood
Nov. 6th, 2017 12:53 am (UTC)
A lovely ode to the season! Thanks for explaining the form so simply. You make it seem less intimidating!
kellyrfineman
Nov. 8th, 2017 05:09 pm (UTC)
Most of the forms can be broken down pretty simply - it's one of my favorite things to work with, in fact. The trick is to find the right subject matter for the form, or the right form for the thought/container. Here, we were "stuck with" the triolet - so I kept it focused on a single image. It's very hard to "travel" using a triolet because of the repeated lines, so it's best for small moments/images or for obsession.
Michelle Kogan
Nov. 8th, 2017 04:15 am (UTC)
you've captured a rolling, rhythmic feeling of fall–calming too, thanks!
kellyrfineman
Nov. 8th, 2017 05:09 pm (UTC)
Thank YOU for stopping by and leaving a comment!
( 26 comments — Leave a comment )

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